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Lymphedema

Compression Garments for Lymphedema

Early Detection and Intervention for Mild and Moderate Lymphedema in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer: A Randomized Trial (NCT00959985)

Summary

Women who have been treated for breast cancer may be at risk of developing lymphedema, which is characterized by a painful swelling of the arm. There currently are no clear treatment guidelines for lymphedema. One treatment option is the use of a compression sleeve to aid the flow of lymph fluid in the arm and prevent swelling. Another option, which is more intensive, involves wearing a compression sleeve as well as special compression bandages on the arm overnight. It is not known whether wearing a compression sleeve and bandages is more effective than the use of a compression sleeve alone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of compression garments in preventing or slowing the progression of lymphedema in breast cancer patients. To be eligible, participants must have mild or moderate lymphedema.
This is a Phase III trial

Early Identification and Treatment of Lymphedema

The Use of Bioimpedance to Determine Pre-Clinical Lymphedema in the Post-Operative Breast Cancer Patient (NCT01521000)

Summary

Lymphedema is a painful swelling of the arm that can develop as a result of breast cancer treatment. The goal of this study is to determine whether identifying lymphedema and treating it as early as possible can help keep it from progressing. The study is also investigating whether bioimpedance, a technique that uses electric current to measure tissue volume, is better than the methods that are currently available for measuring lymphedema.To be eligible, participants must have undergone a sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary node dissection.

Impact of Lymphedema on Quality of Life After Breast Cancer

Prospective Analysis of Symptoms, Functionality and Quality of Life Questionnaires to Evaluate Lymphedema in Patients Following Treatment for Breast Cancer. (NCT01521741)

Summary

Breast cancer treatments can result in long-term, painful swelling of the arm and hand, a condition called lymphedema. The goal of this study is to determine how the symptoms and functional disability that accompany lymphedema can impact breast cancer survivors' quality of life. To be eligible, participants must be planning to have surgery and receive follow-up care for breast cancer at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Detecting and Monitoring Lymphedema

Evaluation of the Validity of BIS as a Tool for Quantification of Lymphedema Through Comparison With Perometry and Self-Report (NCT01544335)

Summary

Lymphedema is a painful swelling of the arm that can develop as a result of breast cancer treatment. Early detection and treatment of lymphedema may be able to help reduce or control this swelling. To improve early detection, better methods of measuring lymph fluid in the arm are needed. Bioimpedance spectroscopy involves using an extremely small electrical current to measure the amount of lymph fluid present in the arm. The goal of this study is to determine whether bioimpedance spectroscopy is as effective at detecting and monitoring lymphedema as a measurement device called a perometer. To be eligible, participants must be receiving follow-up care at Massachusetts General Hospital or the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center.

Exercise & Weight Loss for Overweight Survivors With Lymphedema

The Women In Steady Exercise Research (WISER) Survivor Trial & Cost of Illness and Cost Effectiveness of Alternative Management Strategies (NCT01515124)

Summary

Lymphedema is a painful swelling of the arm or hand that can be caused by breast cancer treatments. Women who are overweight are more likely to develop severe lymphedema. This is a one-year study that will look at whether weight loss and/or exercise can help reduce lymphedema symptoms in inactive breast cancer survivors who are overweight or obese and who have already developed breast cancer related lymphedema. There will be four groups in this trial: exercise only, weight loss only, exercise and weight-loss combined, and a control group. The researchers will also investigate whether exercise and/or weight-loss reduces the risk of recurrence and improves quality of life. To be eligible, participants must have a BMI of 25 or greater.
This is a Phase III trial

Low Level Laser Therapy With Conventional Lymphedema Treatment

The Effectiveness of Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT)Combined With Complex Decongestive Therapy (CDT) in the Treatment of Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study (NCT01351376)

Summary

Lymphedema, a swelling of the arm or hand that may be accompanied by pain, numbness, and infection, can occur after breast cancer treatment. Lymphedema is typically treated with Complex Decongestive Therapy (CDT), which involves skin and nail care, compression sleeves or bandages, arm exercises, and a type of massage called manual fluid drainage. Researchers think that a new technique called Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) that uses low-level lasers to alter cellular function might also be effective for treating lymphedema. This study will investigate whether LLLT in combination with CDT is more effective than CDT alone for treating women with upper arm lymphedema. To be eligible, individuals must have a diagnosis of lymphedema only in one arm, must be a breast cancer survivor, must not be receiving nor planning to receive radiation or chemotherapy, and must not have a body mass index (BMI) greater than 40.

National Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Registry

National Breast Cancer and Lymphedema Registry (NCT01580800)

Summary

Lymphedema, a painful swelling of the hand, wrist, and/or arm, is a potential long-term side effect of breast cancer treatments that can have a large impact on patients' quality of life. The National Breast Cancer Lymphedema Registry is designed to collect information about the effect early diagnostic and treatment strategies have on the development of lymphedema, its severity, and its impact on quality of life.

  • Participation TimeOnline questionnaires and email contact
  • No Visits Required for this TrialNo travel required 

Acupuncture for Chronic Lymphedema

Acupuncture for Chronic Lymphedema: A Randomized Wait-list Controlled Trial (NCT01706081)

Summary

Breast cancer treatment can result in lymphedema, a painful swelling of the arm or hand. It can develop right after breast cancer treatment or weeks, months or even years later. A small, preliminary study conducted by these researchers found that more than one-third of the 33 patients studied had at least a 30 percent reduction in lymphedema following acupuncture treatment, with no serious side effects occurring during the study or in the six months after treatment ended. This study, which is enrolling a larger group of patients, will allow the researchers to continue to study if acupuncture can reduce lymphedema and how long the effects last after acupuncture treatments ends. To be eligible, participants must have lymphedema for at least 6 months and no more than 5 years.
This is a Phase II trial

Axillary Reverse Mapping During Surgery to Reduce Risk of Lymphedema

ARM: Axillary Reverse Mapping (NCT00572481)

Summary

Breast cancer surgery typically involves removing on or more of the axially lymph nodes--the lymph nodes under the arm, where the cancer may have spread. The procedure can increase a woman's risk of developing lymphedema, a painful swelling of the hand, wrist or arm. The location of the lymphatic drainage system may be a risk factor for lymphedema. This study is using axillary reverse mapping (ARM), a procedure that involves injecting blue dye into the lymph system, to identify where the lymph nodes drain and to reduce the risk of lymphedema after breast cancer surgery.
This is a Phase II trial