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Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may have a role in breast cancer care after a breast cancer diagnosis. Clinical trials are investigating which CAM therapies are effective during treatment or can improve quality of life for breast cancer survivors.

Dietary Intervention plus Chemotherapy Before Surgery for Early Stage Breast Cancer

CAREFOR: Precision Medicine Driving Precision Nutrition for the Treatment of NeoAdjuvant Breast Cancer (NCT02827370)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must have been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer but not yet had surgery. This study is looking at whether a dietary intervention that will be determined based on your tumor's genomic characteristics changes the effect that chemotherapy given before surgery has on your cancer cells. Giving chemotherapy before surgery, called neoadjuvant treatment, allows researchers to study the effect a treatment had on the cancer cells after the tumor has been removed. Your tumor's genomic characteristics will be analyzed at the beginning of the study and after you have surgery.

Effect of Olive Oil on Breast Density in High-Risk Women

A Pilot Study of Hydroxytyrosol, a Component of Olive Oil for Breast Cancer Prevention In Women At High Risk Of Breast Cancer (NCT02068092)

Summary

Studies have shown that women with dense breast tissue are at increased risk for developing breast cancer. Laboratory studies have found that hydroxytyrosol--a major component of olive oil--is a powerful antioxidant with very low toxicity in the human body, even at high doses. Researchers think that hydroxytyrosol may reduce dense breast tissue. This study will evaluate the effect that hydroxytyrosol has on the breast tissue of women who are at high risk for developing breast cancer.

Effect of Tumeric on Breast Tissue in Obese, High-Risk Women

Nanoemulsion Curcumin for Obesity, Inflammation and Breast Cancer Prevention - a Pilot Trial (NCT01975363)

Summary

Laboratory studies suggest that tumeric (curcumin) may have anti-cancer effects. This may be because tumeric can reduce inflammation, which has been linked to cancer growth. Researchers think that tumeric may reduce inflammation in fat tissue and breast tissue, which may decrease breast cancer risk. This pilot study is looking at the effect that tumeric has on the breast tissue of obese women who are at high risk for breast cancer.

Effect of Vitamin D on Breast Cells in Women With DCIS or LCIS

An Exploratory Pilot Study of Vitamin D Supplementation in Women With DCIS and/or LCIS (NCT02936999)

Summary

DCIS is a non-invasive breast cancer. Non-invasive means it has not spread out of the milk duct into the breast tissue. LCIS is an area of abnormal cell growth. Having DCIS or LCIS increases your risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, researchers will have women with LCIS or DCIS take vitamin D before surgery. The researchers will then study the tissue removed during surgery to see the effect the vitamin D has had on the breast cells.

A Mindful Movement Program for Breast Cancer Survivors Age 50 and Over

Mindful Movement for Breast Cancer Survivors (NCT02619292)

Summary

Mindfulness is turning one's awareness to the present moment. Some research suggests that practicing mindfulness during activities such as qi gong or yoga may improve emotional and physical well-being as well as immune function. This study is investigating the effect of a Mindful Movement Program in breast cancer survivors age 50 and over. To be eligible, a woman must have completed primary treatment for DCIS or stage I, II or III breast cancer at least six months earlier and not already take part in a weekly yoga, qi gong, tai chi, dance/movement therapy, or mindfulness meditation practice.

Yoga for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy

A Yoga Program for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy: Effects on Quality of Life and Chemotherapy-associated Symptoms (NCT02360904)

Summary

Yoga is a mind-body intervention that has been shown to reduce fatigue and improve overall quality of life in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. This study is comparing the effect that yoga has on quality of life when the classes are started immediately or three months after beginning chemotherapy. To be eligible, patients must be scheduled to receive chemotherapy or have been on chemotherapy for less than two weeks; not planning on starting yoga; and not have done yoga regularly within 3 months of enrolling in the study.

Yoga During Radiation Therapy

Biobehavioral Effects of Yoga for Women With Breast Cancer Undergoing Radiotherapy (NCT01202851)

Summary

Researchers believe that mind-body interventions can be beneficial to women undergoing breast cancer treatment. Yoga is a mind-body intervention that has been shown to reduce fatigue as well as improve quality of sleep, physical vitality, and overall quality of life in women being treated for breast cancer. This study will compare the effectiveness of a yoga program with a stretching/relaxation program for improving the physical and emotional well-being of women with DCIS or Stage I-III breast cancer who are undergoing radiation treatment after surgery. The study will also include a group of women who will not take part in either the yoga or stretching/relaxation program. To be eligible, participants must be planning to receive radiation therapy following breast surgery. In addition, participants must not have practiced yoga in the year prior to breast cancer diagnosis.
This is a Phase III trial

Qigong for Managing Post-Surgery Pain in Breast Cancer Survivors

Qigong Mind-Body Exercise For Persistent Post-Surgical Pain In Breast Cancer Survivors: A Pilot Study (NCT02848989)

Summary

Qigong is an ancient Eastern exercise that involves rhythmic breathing and movement. This study is looking at whether taking part in a Quigong exercise program helps decrease pain and improve physical function and quality of life in breast cancer survivors. To take part, you must be have post-surgical pain at least 3 months after having completed surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation.
This is a Phase I trial

Acupuncture to Reduce Side Effects in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Taxol

Acupuncture to Reduce Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Severity During Neoadjuvant or Adjuvant Weekly Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study (NCT02364726)

Summary

Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical technique that involves inserting very thin needles into specific points on the body. Studies suggest it can help reduce certain types of pain. Paciltaxel (Taxol®) is a chemotherapy drug used to treat breast cancer. One of the side effects associated with Taxol is numbness, tingling, or burning pain in the hands or feet. (This side effect is called peripheral neuropathy.) Acupuncture may be able to reduce this pain. This study is investigating whether weekly acupuncture reduces pain in women who are receiving a chemotherapy regimen that includes weekly Taxol before or after surgery to treat stage I-III breast cancer.

Lifestyle Changes During Radiation Therapy to Improve Outcomes

The Role of Lifestyle Factors in Breast Cancer-Related Outcomes (NCT02079662)

Summary

Researchers are studying the effects that lifestyle has on the risk of a breast cancer recurrence, quality of life, physical functioning, hormone levels and immune function. This study is looking at the effect that a comprehensive lifestyle change program that addresses diet, exercise, and stress has on women with stage III breast cancer who are scheduled to have a 4 to 6-week course of radiation. To be eligible patients must have a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher. They must also not eat more than 3 servings of fruits/vegetables a day or exercise more than 75 minutes per week.

Exercise for Early-Stage Survivors on Aromatase Inhibitors

Combined Exercise Program for Early Breast Cancer Survivors (NCT01140282)

Summary

Three aromatase inhibitors — letrozole (Femara®), anastrozole (Arimidex®), and exemestane (Aromasin®) — are widely used as adjuvant (after surgery) treatment in women with hormone-sensitive tumors. These drugs, however, frequently cause side effects that can affect quality of life, such as vaginal dryness, loss of libido, sleep problems, joint pain, fatigue, and bone loss. Researchers believe that regular physical activity may offset some of these side effects. Exercise also can improve bone health and help prevent osteoporosis. The goal of this trial is to assess the value of a community-based exercise program in early-stage breast cancer survivors who are currently taking an aromatase inhibitor. To be eligible, participants must not currently exercise more than 60 minutes per week.

Exercise or Mind-Body Program Before Surgery

The Preoperative Health & Body Study (NCT01516190)

Summary

This study is designed to look at the changes that occur in women who take part in exercise and mind-body programs between their breast cancer diagnosis and breast surgery. The investigators are interested in seeing if these programs can decrease stress and anxiety and improve mood and quality of life during this time. The investigators are also interested in looking at whether this type of short program affects certain markers in breast cancer cells, such as their growth and death rates, or in blood hormones such as insulin, which have been linked to breast cancer development. To be eligible, participants must not be planning to receive chemotherapy or hormone therapy before surgery.

Effect of Vitamin D and Physical Activity on Bone Health

The Effect of High-Dose Vitamin D and Physical Activity on Bone Health in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Hormonal Therapy (NCT01419730)

Summary

Some breast cancer treatments can speed up bone loss or cause women to lose more bone than they normally would. It is not known if bone loss in breast cancer survivors should be treated differently than bone loss in other women. This study is examining the effectiveness of vitamin D with and without physical activity (walking and progressive resistance exercise) in reducing bone loss in women who have been treated for breast cancer. The investigators will also study whether the physical activity program improves cardiovascular fitness, energy expenditure, muscular strength, muscle mass, and balance. To be eligible, participants must be less than five years from the diagnosis of breast cancer and within six months of starting treatment with aromatase inhibitors.
This is a Phase II trial

Curcumin for Reducing Fatigue Related to Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy

Randomized Phase II Study of Curcumin Versus Placebo for Inhibition of NF-kB DNA Binding in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Chemotherapy-Treated Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy (NCT01740323)

Summary

Fatigue is one of the most common side effect of radiation therapy. Previous studies have found that the NF-kB pathway appears to play a role in chemotherapy- and radiation-related inflammation and fatigue. Curcumin—an active component in turmeric—is a known inhibitor of the NF-kB protein. Researchers think decreasing the activity of NK-kB may reduce fatigue in women with breast cancer being treated with radiation. Meriva is a curcumin formula that is well absorbed by the body. In this study, researchers will compare the effectiveness of Meriva to a placebo for controlling cancer-related fatigue in women receiving whole-breast radiation. To be eligible, a woman must be scheduled to receive whole-breast radiation.
This is a Phase II trial

Melatonin to Reduce Fatigue Caused by Radiation Therapy

Melatonin Supplementation for Cancer-related Fatigue in Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Double Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial (NCT02332928)

Summary

Fatigue is a common side effect of radiation therapy. Melatonin is a hormone made naturally by the body that helps regulate sleep and wake cycles. Researchers think giving melatonin supplements to women before, during, and after their radiation therapy may help reduce fatigue. This study is comparing the effectiveness of melatonin supplements to a placebo in women receiving radiation as part of their breast cancer treatment.
This is a Phase III trial

Acupuncture for Women with AI-Related Joint Pain

Effects of Acupuncture on Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Joint Pain (NCT02548637)

Summary

Joint pain is one of the most common side effects associated with aromatase inhibitors (AIs)—anastrazole (Arimidex®), letrozole (Femara®), exemestane (Aromasin®). Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medical technique that involves inserting sterile, hair-thin needles into specific points on the skin to stimulate the nervous system. In this study, researchers will study the effect of acupuncture in women experiencing joint pain while on an AI. To be eligible, a woman must have been on an AI continuously for at least the preceding 2 months and not have had acupuncture treatment within 6 months of study enrollment.

Acupuncture for Treating Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

Acupuncture for CIPN in Breast Cancer Patients (NCT02615678)

Summary

Peripheral neuropathy--pain, tingling, burning, or a numbness sensation in the hands and feet—is a common side effect of chemotherapy. Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine technique that involves inserting sterile, hair-thin needles into specific points on the skin to stimulate the nervous system. This study will evaluate the effect that acupuncture treatments have on breast cancer patients who have developed peripheral neuropathy. To be eligible, patients must currently be receiving chemotherapy and have been experiencing symptoms for at least 1 month.

Massage to Reduce Anxiety Before Breast Cancer Surgery

Utility of Preoperative Massage in Breast Surgery Patients (NCT01667328)

Summary

It is not uncommon for patients to report feeling anxious prior to their breast cancer surgery. Studies have demonstrated that massage can offer some health benefits for people with cancer. Massage has also been found to be help reduce anxiety. This study is investigating whether breast cancer patients who receive massage therapy by a licensed massage therapist before surgery have lower anxiety levels than those who do not receive massage therapy.

Mindfulness Meditation & Survivorship Education After DCIS & Stage I-III Breast Cancer

Improving Outcomes for Younger Breast Cancer Survivors: A Phase III Randomized Trial Targeting Behavioral Symptoms in Younger Breast Cancer Survivors (NCT03025139)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must be have been diagnosed with DCIS or stage I, II, or III breast cancer within the last five years. Your diagnosis must have occurred when you were age 45 or younger. You must also show symptoms of depression on the study's screening questionnaire. This study is comparing the benefits of mindfulness meditation and survivorship education for reducing symptoms of depression in women who were diagnosed with DCIS or stage I, II or III breast cancer before age 45. Mindfulness meditation may help you change the way you respond to thoughts and life events. Survivorship education tailored to younger survivors may help help reduce stress and improve well-being and quality of life.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Preventing AI-Induced Pain for Women with Stage I-III Disease

Prevention of Aromatase Inhibitor-Induced Toxicity With Omega-3 Supplementation (NCT02831582)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must have had surgery for stage I, II or III breast cancer and be planning to start taking an aromatase inhibitor. This study is investigating whether omega-3 fatty acid supplements (fish oil) will help prevent bone and joint pain in women being treated with an aromatase inhibitor. Omega-3 fatty acids are not made by the body. They are obtained only through foods or supplements.

Reiki Therapy to Reduce Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients On an Aromatase Inhibitor

Pilot Study on Energy Therapy or Massage to Reduce Fatigue in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients on Hormone Therapy (NCT02758756)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must have stage I, II or III breast cancer, be on an aromatase inhibitor, and be experiencing extreme tiredness (fatigue). This study is investigating whether a type of touch therapy, called Reiki, can help reduce fatigue in breast cancer survivors who are taking an aromatase inhibitor. Reiki is a gentle touch therapy that its practitioners say helps promote healing and well-being by unblocking and balancing the flow of energy within the body.
This is a Phase I-II trial

Effects of Hypnosis During Breast Cancer Surgery

Biobehavioral Effects of Hypnosis During Breast Cancer Surgery (NCT03012399)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must have recently been diagnosed with DCIS or stage I breast cancer and be planning to have breast surgery. This study is investigating a relaxation method called hypnosedation. Using this technique before and during breast cancer surgery may allow patients to avoid having general anesthesia. Hypnosedation is administered by a hypnotherapist, a mind-body specialist who uses words and images to help you relax during surgery.

Vitamin D When Starting on an Aromatase Inhibitor to Reduce Bone/Joint Pain

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of High Dose vs. Standard Dose Vitamin D for Aromatase-Inhibitor Induced Arthralgia in Breast Cancer Survivors (NCT01988090)

Summary

Aromatase inhibitors—anastrazole (Arimidex®), letrozole (Femara®), exemestane (Aromasin®)—are routinely used to treat hormone-sensitive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Joint/muscle pain is one of the most common side effects caused by these drugs. Vitamin D deficiency can result in a wide array of musculoskeletal issues. Some studies have suggested that vitamin D may help prevent or reduce aromatase inhibitor-related joint/muscle pain. This study is looking at the safety and effectiveness of two different doses of vitamin D for reducing joint/muscle pain in postmenopausal women with stage I to III breast cancer who are starting treatment with an aromatase inhibitor.
This is a Phase II trial

Omega-3 Fatty Acids to Reduce Paclitaxel-Related Pain

A Pilot Randomized, Placebo Controlled, Double Blind Study of Omega-3 Fatty Acids to Prevent Paclitaxel Associated Acute Pain Syndrome (NCT01821833)

Summary

Omega-3 fatty acids are nutrients that are essential for good health. Omega-3 fatty acids are not made by the body; they are obtained through foods or supplements. Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is a chemotherapy drug commonly used to treat breast cancer. One of it most common side effects is pain. Studies suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may help decrease Taxol-related pain. This study is looking at whether omega-3 fatty acids are better than a placebo for reducing pain. To be eligible, participants must be scheduled to receive treatment with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel.

A Program to Reduce Insomnia (Trouble Sleeping) Caused by Cancer or its Treatment

Brief Behavioral Intervention for Insomnia During Chemotherapy (NCT02165839)

Summary

Many women report that they experience insomnia--trouble sleeping--during their breast cancer treatment. A behavioral therapy program may help breast cancer patients cope with their insomnia. This study will compare a behavioral therapy program for insomnia to a healthy eating program in women being treated with chemotherapy or a biological therapy, like Herceptin, for early-stage breast cancer. To be eligible, a woman must have insomnia that began or got worse when she was diagnosed with cancer or began systemic treatment with chemotherapy or biological therapy.

Acupuncture for Relieving Severe Post-Mastectomy Pain

Randomized-Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Post-Mastectomy Pain Syndrome (NCT02754752)

Summary

To take part in this study, you must have had a mastectomy at least 4 months ago. You must also have had persistent pain in your chest area for at least 3 months. In addition, you must have seen your oncologist within the last 6 months. Electro-acupuncture is a two-step process. First, hair-thin needles are put into specific points in your body. Then, a mild electrical current is applied to the needles at a level that is comfortable to you. This study is investigating whether electro-acupuncture can help reduce pain women may experience after their mastectomy.
This is a Phase II trial

Comparing Hypnosis and Muscle Relaxation for Improving Self-Image After a Cancer Diagnosis

A Mind-body Intervention to Improve Body and/or Self Image: a Phase II Randomized Trial (NCT02531997)

Summary

Hypnotic relaxation therapy uses hypnosis, a technique that helps individuals enter a state of calm, alert awareness, to help people make personal changes. Progressive muscle relaxation therapy is a relaxation techniques that uses tensing and relaxing of the muscles to help people become more aware of physical sensations. This study will investigate whether hypnotic relaxation therapy is more effective than progressive muscle relaxation therapy for improving body/self-image in women who have been diagnosed with breast (or gynecologic) cancer. To be eligible, a woman must report having had a change in body/self image since her cancer diagnosis, wish to improve her body/self-image, and be able to attend sessions at the University of Michigan Cancer Center.

Broccoli Sprout Extract In ER+ Breast Cancer

A Pilot Study of Broccoli Sprout Extract in Patients With Invasive Breast Cancer (NCT01753908)

Summary

Broccoli is a member of the brassicales family. Studies have found that plants and flowers that are part of this family contain chemicals, called isothiocyanates, that may prevent or slow the growth of certain cancers. This study is comparing broccoli sprout extract to a placebo in order to see whether broccoli sprout extract alters biological markers associated with cancer cell growth when it is given to postmenopausal women with early-stage ER+ breast cancer for two weeks prior to the start of their cancer treatment.

Integrative Therapy Program to Prevent Lymphedema after Surgery

Prevention of Secondary Lymphedema by Utilizing Self-management Education in Conjunction With Acupuncture Among Breast Cancer Patients Who Are at High Risk of Developing Lymphedema (NCT02528539)

Summary

Lymphedema is a painful swelling in the arm, hand, or wrist caused by a build-up of lymph fluid. Women whose breast cancer surgery includes removing lymph nodes under the arm that contain cancer cells--called an axillary lymph node dissection--are at increased risk of developing lymphedema. Researchers have developed an integrative therapy program for lymphedema that includes acupuncture along with education on the benefits of a healthy diet, exercise, and lymphatic drainage techniques women can do on their own. This study is evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of using this integrative therapy program to reduce the risk of lymphedema after breast cancer surgery. To be eligible, women must be newly diagnosed with stage I-III breast cancer and have had an axillary lymph node dissection within 4-6 weeks prior to enrollment.

Glutamine Supplements to Prevent Radiation-Related Side Effects

Glutamine for the Prevention of Radiation Toxicity in Subjects Undergoing Breast (NCT02012608)

Summary

Radiation used to damage cancer in your body can also damage healthy cells. Glutamine is an amino acid that helps fuel cell division. Previous studies have found that glutamine supplements may help prevent or treat skin toxicity by promoting DNA or tissue damage repair to healthy cells. This study will compare the effects of glutamine and a placebo in patients with stage I or stage II breast cancer who are having accelerated partial breast radiation following a lumpectomy (breast conserving surgery) for their breast cancer treatment.
This is a Phase II trial

Vitamin D to Treat Anti-Estrogen Therapy Side Effects in Women with Stage IV Breast Cancer

Safety, Feasibility and Efficacy of Vitamin D Supplementation in Women With Metastatic Breast Cancer (SAFE-D) (NCT02186015)

Summary

Anti-estrogen therapies are used to treat ER+ and/or PR+ breast cancer. Side effects of these therapies include pain, fatigue, mood and sleep disturbances. Researchers think that vitamin D supplements may help reduce these side effects. However, vitamin D can also lead to excess calcium in the blood, which could increase estrogen production in the body. This study will monitor blood calcium and vitamin D levels to identify the best dose and effectiveness of a vitamin D supplement for reducing anti-estrogen related side effects in women with metastatic breast cancer.
This is a Phase I trial

Nutrition Education and Acupuncture for Weight Loss After Chemotherapy

Comparison of Weight Loss Among Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Post Chemotherapy: Nutrition Education in Combination With Weight Loss Acupuncture Vs. Nutrition Education Alone (NCT02081612)

Summary

Studies have found that women with breast cancer who are overweight or who gain weight after their diagnosis are at increased risk of having a cancer recurrence. Acupuncture uses hair-thin needles to stimulate energy in the body. Acupuncture may help improve short and long-term weight loss among breast cancer survivors who have been treated with chemotherapy. This study is investigating whether using acupuncture along with a nutrition education program is better than using a nutrition education program alone in helping breast cancer survivors lose weight. To be eligible, participants must have completed breast cancer treatment and have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater.

Effect of CTAP101 in Breast Cancer Patients with Bone Metastases

Effect of CTAP101 Capsules on Serum Calcium and Plasma Intact Parathyroid Hormone and Vitamin D Metabolites in Patients With Advanced Breast or Prostate Carcinomas With Metastases to Bone and Receiving Ongoing Therapy With Denosumab or Zoledronic Acid (NCT02274623)

Summary

CTAP101 (calcifediol/Rayaldy™) was developed to treat patients with chronic kidney disease who have low levels of vitamin D. It is designed to increase vitamin D levels by increasing blood levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Researchers think the drug, which comes in capsule form, may also help patients with breast cancer that has spread to the bone. Denosumab and Zoledronic acid (Zometa) are currently used along with chemotherapy to treat bone damage in metastatic breast cancer patients. This study is looking at the safety, best dose and efficacy of CTAP101 when it is given to women with metastatic breast cancer that has spread to the bone who are currently being treated with denosumab or Zometa. To be eligible, a woman must have been taking Zometa or denosumab for at least 3 months. This study is also recruiting men with metastatic prostate cancer.
This is a Phase I trial

Identifying Tissue Biomarkers to Study Omega-3 Fatty Acids for Breast Cancer Prevention

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and ERPR(-) and HER-2/Neu(+/-) Breast Cancer Prevention (NCT02295059)

Summary

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fatty fish and other foods. DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) are omega-3 fatty acids. Researchers think omega-3 fatty acids may decrease cancer risk by reducing inflammation in the body and interfering with tumor cell growth. In this study, researchers will take tissue samples from women receiving two different doses of DHA and EPA in order to identify tissue biomarkers they can use in future studies that will evaluate the use of omega-3 fatty acids for breast cancer prevention. To be eligible, a woman must have a tumor that is ER/PR-negative and have completed breast cancer treatment.
This is a Phase I trial

Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Given Before Surgery on Breast Cancer Cells

A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase II Clinical Trial of Omega-3 PUFA Dietary Supplementation in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Carcinoma (NCT01869764)

Summary

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential nutrients for good health. They are not made by the body, and are obtained only through foods or supplements. Laboratory studies suggest omega-3 fatty acids can slow the growth of cancer cells. This study is comparing the effect of omega-3 fatty acids to the effect of a placebo on breast cancer cells. To be eligible, participants must be planning to have breast cancer surgery (lumpectomy or mastectomy) at least 7 days from the start of the study.